• Was late
  • Did not ask the hiring manager what his/her “vision” for the territory is, what qualities the person he hires will possess that will make them successful—those qualities are what will get you hired if you can convince them that you possess them!
  • Did all the talking, rambled, or didn’t ask questions or have a “back and forth” interaction in the interview
  • Was a “know it all”–had all the answers (well prepared, but not tailored for that interview)
  • Didn’t answer the question being asked
  • Violated the 90 second rule by rambling on and on
  • Didn’t get to know the manager or what makes him/her tick
  • Did not sell themselves (did not ask about the territory or get enough information to use in the interview to sell themselves, provide the benefits that you bring to that position, uncover a need or an issue, provide a solution, trial close and then close again at the end–by using the answers you’ve gotten in the interview.)
  • Lack of eye contact or exhibits nervous gestures
  • Weird body language (one guy stood up in the interview and made weird hand gestures, I guess to make a point, but the manager felt threatened and embarrassed)
  • Not being “self-aware” (this is a big one I hear a lot — I don’t know how to teach someone to be “self-aware”, but that one is important)… as an example, if the interviewer is clearly wrapping things up to get to the next person, but this person doesn’t read those “signals” and keeps on talking— then they usually call me and say they are really excited because they got extra time with the interviewer.
  • Providing VAGUE answers instead of specific examples (skirting the question, pumping up someone’s experience that they didn’t really have–Or they had it within a “team” or POD and are trying to take sole credit for it–that stuff usually backfires)
  • When the interviewer knows that the person has made more money in a prior job and asks questions about desired income and the person is vague–or won’t answer.  The interviewer usually thinks the person just wants a “job”, not a career and once hired will continue to look for a better paying job.  They haven’t convinced the manager that they want a CAREER.

The people who are getting hired seem to do everything right and energize the room when they are interviewing.  There’s good synergy on both sides and they know how to take control of the interview without the interviewer realizing they are in control (which is what good salespeople do all day long!).  They find a way to “connect” or “click” with the hiring manager(s).