• Professional appearance (wear a business suit and look professional—no visible tattoos, piercings, no sandals/open toed shoes, watch “trendy” hairstyles, and limit or shave facial hair); Also turn off your cell phone, no chewing gum, show up at least 10 to 15 minutes early, and have good posture during the interview. Get a good night’s sleep the night before!

 

  • “Leave Behind”: bring copies of your resume for everyone you will be interviewing with (a tabbed folder is impressive); include anything that you feel makes you “memorable” after you leave and the DM is reviewing resumes and deciding who to move forward in the process.  Ideas include a “Business Plan” for the territory (using zip code information or key physicians and key products—sometimes called a 30-60-90 Day Plan); References (former managers, co-workers, RDs, Doctors, Nurses, Pharmacists, etc—as many as you want to include—as long as it prints to one page); DMV Report (proving you have a good driving record—not necessary, though; if you’ve won a National Award, a copy of the letter documenting the win is a really nice touch; a Why Hire Me?” pagelisting the attributes you bring (again, not necessary, but impressive); and if you have letter of recommendations” from one or two of the top specialty doctors or former bosses — these accolades could be impressive to your future DM.
    • TERRITORY BUSINESS PLAN: if a map is available, use the cities in the territory to identify key doctors that you will be calling on, typically 10 to 15 doctors a day in the specialty you are interviewing for; add 3 to 4 Pharmacy sales calls to your daily plan. Find out as much information about the new job as you can. A “friendly Pharmacist” or Nurse might be able to help you!
    • If you are “tech-savvy”, you can choose to download a Powerpoint onto an iPad or Notebook and use that as a Sales Aide to sell yourself in your interview. If you do this, print out the Powerpoint to leave behind with your resume—it’s a reminder to the hiring manager about your interview and why they want to hire you! AND, you have to bring your resume to the interview anyway, so a powerpoint or folder with extra information in it helps to sell YOU!

 

  • Brag Book:  This should include documentation of the sales results and awards that you have listed on your resume (proof of what you claim)—don’t use your brag book as a “crutch” but reference it as you would a sales aide in a sales call.  If you won an award, you could briefly reference the “AwardsTab to prove you won that award; a college transcript is impressive, although not necessary; a copy of your degree is impressive; Sales Statistics are always welcome—such as year-end rankings and quarterly sales numbers showing your rank; Field Contact Reports; Annual Sales Performance Reviews, if you have a “wall of plaques and awards”—take a picture of it; Letters of Recommendation (get this on your doctor’s letterhead—and also the company letterhead, if your manager is allowed to put something in writing; and lastly, if you have received a Promotion or have been asked to be a “District Sales Skills Trainer” or recognized as being promotable by taking on Regional activities, include that documentation, etc
    • RESEARCH THE COMPANY WEBSITE AND READ ABOUT THE PRODUCTS YOU’LL BE SELLING! Do this before your PHONE INTERVIEW and certainly know as much as possible before your live interview. Go to a Pharmacy and ask about local prescribing habits and the Managed Care landscape of the Insurance Providers. You can research your area on “Fingertip Formulary” online. The more you know, the better position you will be in!

 

  • Effective Communication Skills:  Very important!  If a question is asked of you, make sure you answer that question. Don’t violate the 90-second rule!  If examples are requested, make sure to give examples.  Do NOT ramble or be long-winded, you only have so much time during an interview!  Watch the “ah’s and um’s”!

 

  • Body Language and EYE contact:  Unspoken, but just as important as what you say!

 

  • Show off your strong SELLING skills:  this is a SALES job and you are in the interview SELLING YOURSELF—-ask good questions, listen effectively, uncover their “needs” (computer skills trainer, sales training skills, sales data analysis skills, as an example), and then offer features, advantages, and benefits of the manager hiring YOU (do this in the way you are comfortable with—they will recognize that you utilize good selling skills in an interview—which translates to how you’ll behave in a sales call.
    • Example of how to ASK for the job: “I am competitive, build strong relationships, and self-motivated to go out and find new business every day. I am excited to join a cohesive team such as your team and want to be part of helping you build and grow this business. What is the next step for me?”

 

  • Self confidence:  Confidence, not cockiness, will make you stand outAlso, have good energy and enthusiasm; The DM is looking for “Passion”—that you really like selling your products.  The DM is looking for “Self-Motivation”—someone who can work well autonomously, but is also coachable and wants to learn new things.

 

  • Performance Factors:  See the attached list of INTERVIEWING COMPETENCIES—these are “metrics” that hiring managers will be evaluating you for.

 

  • Coachability:  Let the DM know you enjoy learning new things you pick things up quickly, and are a good team player.

 

  • No one is perfect:  if you don’t know something, just say so!  Then make sure you find out!

 

  • ROLE PLAY/QUESTIONS/WEBSITE:  Read and re-read the WEBSITE, the PRODUCTS, and study  the package insert to know what the product is used for, and be prepared to ROLE PLAY a sales call to demonstrate a sales pitch with products you currently sell or something in the room From the company website, come up with some intelligent questions to ask (the “vision” he/she has for the sales team; challenges they have faced selling this product; what key factors makes their top sales rep successful; questions that show you care about the company and about their sales team, NOT “what’s in it for ME type of questions”).  It’s OK to ask a question that you already know the answer to—let the hiring manager explain in his/her own words.  Google “StAR” INTERVIEW QUESTIONS and be prepared to answer SITUATIONAL” questions:  Tell me about a time when….? Give some examples of….?  How did you win over a tough customer….?   How did you handle a “negative objection”….?  There are hundreds and hundreds of examples online!  This preparation will boost your self-confidence

 

  • Duration:  Allow at least an HOUR, and it may go longer, may be shorter—but—take the CUES from the hiring manager if he/she appears to be wrapping up the interview or winding things down.  They want to know you can “TAKE A HINT” when you’re selling to a busy physician with limited time.

 

  • CLOSE:  ASK for the job!  Tell the hiring manager that you want to be on their team; what you will bring to the District; you can’t wait to get started; you will hit the ground running.  Acknowledge they need to see other candidates, but YOU are ready to come on board.
    • IMPORTANT: Ask for their BUSINESS CARD so you can write a THANK YOU NOTE (email is fine—do it the same day!).  ****If you don’t get a business card, you can ask your recruiter to forward a message to the person who interviewed you.